ISMAR 2009: The World’s Best Augmented Reality Event Wants You to Contribute!

This post is directed at you. Yes – you: the augmented reality aficionado.

For those who followed my coverage of ISMAR 2008 – prepare to be blown away by ISMAR 2009.


If you are an AR researcher – ISMAR 2009 is as always the best event to learn about the latest and greatest in AR technology.

If you work in the AR industry – congratulations! Unlike previous years – at ISMAR 2009 you’ll see AR breaking out into commercial success.

If you work in interactive entertainment – come to ISMAR 2009 to experience the phenomen that will revolutionize interactive entertainment forever.

If you are an artist – at ISMAR 2009 you’ll have an opportunity to join this emerging industry and change the way people experience the world, literally.

Interested? Good.

Because all of the above will only transpire – if YOU contribute.

ISMAR 2009 is now officially calling for proposals.

Here are excerpts from the call for proposals. For details check out the official call.

The veteran Science and Technology track will be complemented this year with new Arts, Media and Humanities tracks. ISMAR 2009 will introduce expanded Tutorials, Workshops, Demonstrations and Competitions.

Topics of the Technical Track:

Sensing – Tracking technologies, calibration methods, sensor fusion, vision-based registration and tracking, acquisition of 3D scene descriptions
Information presentation – Object overlay and spatial layout techniques, handling of occlusions or x-ray vision, photorealistic augmentation, real-time augmentation, optical display technologies (HWDs, HMDs, HUDs, mobile projectors), aural or haptic augmentation, combined presentation across several displays (combining mobile and stationary devices), display and view management
User interaction – Interaction techniques and metaphors for MR/AR, collaborative MR/AR, multimodal input and output, tangible interaction, combined interaction with virtual and real objects
Human factors – Usability studies and experiments of MR/AR-based interaction and presentation concepts, acceptance of MR/AR technology, social implications
System architecture – Wearable and mobile computing, distributed and collaborative MR/AR, display hardware, performance issues (real-time approaches), embedded computing for MR/AR, integration of MR/AR technologies into wide-area pervasive computing environments
MR/AR applications – across all areas of personal and professional activities, such as: Personal MR/AR information systems, games, applications in industry, military, medicine, science, entertainment, architecture, tourism, art, cultural heritage, education, training etc.

Topics of the Arts, Media & Humanities Tracks:

Compelling applications of Mixed & Augmented Reality. Applications include artistic expression, experiential-media or interpretive pieces that reflect the study of the human condition.
• Art – The Art program is looking for notable artists that have stretched the boundaries of expression with the use of Mixed and Augmented Reality.  The creative interaction between real, virtual and the imaginary realities to create provoking experiences are highly encouraged.  Written papers and posters are to include position statement with notes and images on approach, implementation and the technology used.  A gallery show will be mounted to support physical entries (see call for demonstrations).
Media – submissions from media practitioners who have stretched the boundaries of the creative impact of Mixed and Augmented Reality.  This venue seeks innovative uses of creative techniques for communication and entertainment to enhance the experience of MR/AR through novel applications of head-mounted, embedded projection, or mobile displays.  Submissions may include new tools, conventions or taxonomies for developing these new media.
Humanities – academic submissions that relate to Mixed and Augmented Reality content that allows for innovative analytical, critical or speculative approaches to reflect the study of the human condition. and digital media.

Call for Innovation Workshops

ISMAR 2009 will have a series of workshops the day before the conference (Monday) to cover the innovative application of Mixed and Augmented Reality to specific industry domains.  Three workshops have been defined.  We invite you to submit papers or panel discussions that will address topics of transferring MR/AR to solve critical real world problems (see web site for details).  If your paper or panel does not fit the existing workshop, you may submit a proposal for a new workshop.
Designing the Future (Design and Manufacturing Workshop):  This workshop will continue the ISMAR legacy of showcasing the pioneering efforts of the auto and other industries’ use of Mixed and Augmented Reality as design tools.
Falling in Love with Learning (Entertainment & Education Workshop):  Entertainment and Education converge in Mixed Reality Experiential Learning Landscapes for museums, libraries, schools and parks.
Transforming Lives (Medical and Military Training Workshop):  Extreme Mixed Reality needs to meet high-risk, high-performance training to enhance human preparation for life and death scenarios.

Call for Pioneering Tutorials

To mark ten years of ISMAR, the 2009 conference will include a three-day comprehensive tutorial program that covers a wide spectrum of topics in Mixed and Augmented Reality.  We are looking for submissions from pioneers to share their experiences and insights.  Formats can be from 30 to 90 minutes.  These tutorials will be video captured and distributed as a series along with special features covering the work of pioneering laboratories worldwide.

Call for Demonstrations

There will be four formats to submit demonstrations.  Demonstrations can be related to papers, posters or panels, but that is not required.  A proposed abstract, floor plan and list of requirements are requested with the letter of intent (see websites for details).  Accepted Participants will receive notification by June 30th, 2009 to start coordination with the ISMAR 2009 Planning Committee.  To accommodate late breaking discoveries, we will accept “Laboratory Demonstrations” until the last minute, pending committee discretion and conference  accommodations (submissions received after August 15th, 2009 will not be included in the publications). Letters of intent are recommended for all submissions to assist in the planning.
Laboratory Demonstrations will provide the opportunity for “late breaking” research teams to informally demonstrate their latest inventions and allow for interaction with attendees and other pioneers.
Research Showcase will be a more formal presentation of innovative Mixed and Augmented Reality content that involve more production support and exhibit design considerations.
Art Gallery will present innovative Mixed and Augmented Reality artwork within a unique gallery format based on a combination of invited and submitted work.
Innovation Exhibitions (See industry/Sponsor relations) will feature the latest commercially available products and services for use in Mixed and Augmented Reality applications.  The exhibition will be available for rental to industry buyers from the entertainment, medical, military and educational markets.  A special “Start-up Park” will be available for small, first time commercial exhibitors at more affordable prices.  Early registration is recommended for the expected increased participation and limited space.

Tracking Competition

The first event of this kind at ISMAR 08 ( caught much attention. A sequel will be organized at ISMAR 2009. Details regarding the tracking task and the rules of competition will be made available on the web site. It is to be expected that only a limited number of teams can participate.


Don’t be wary.

Even if you do not have a rigorous research paper – you still have an important role in ISMAR 2009.

If you have developed a cool AR tool, app or game, or –

if you have conceptualized an interesting AR idea, or even-

if you just had a vision of the killer AR app  – we want to hear from you!

Don’t wait for the May 16th deadline – you can’t afford to. Submit your proposal today.


Send your proposals to:

Gudrun Klinker, Blair MacIntyre and Hideo Saito

Science and Technology Program Chairs (

Blair MacIntyre

Art and Humanities Program Co-Chair (,

Jay Bolter

Humanities Program Chair (

Jarrell Pair

Media Program Chair (

Charlie Hughes

Tutorial Chair (

Christian Sandor

Laboratory Demonstration Chair (

Sean White,

Research Showcase Chair (

Larry Davis

Innovation Exhibition Chair (

Christopher Stapleton

Interim Workshop Chair (

Daniel Pustka

Tracking Contest Chair (

We want to hear from you!

As a member of ISMAR’s Media track committee – I hereby vow to emphatically review every single proposal in the media track. Your voice must be heard.

Live from ISMAR ’08: Is Augmented Reality at Work Better than Reality Itself ?

Bruce Thomas introduces the afternoon session at ISMAR ’08 focusing on user studies in industrial augmented reality.

First is Johannes Tuemler which will talk about Mobile Augmented Reality in Industrial Applications: Approaches for Solution of User-Related Issues.

The study looks at psychological and ergonomic factors in augmented reality usage and create a requirements catalog for mobile AR assistance systems in diverse scenarios. This was a collaboration with Volkswagen, Ergonomics department in Ott-von-Wolfsburg,  Perception Psychology from Weymar University, and Information technology by the Fraunhofer Institute.

The reference scenario chosen was “AR picking”, where subjects would work for a couple of hours of picking items from shelves using a mobile AR device. The users reported no rise of stress level with an AR system compared with no AR (except for some visual discomfort). Since the AR system was less than optimal, the research may point to the fact that with a better AR system the stress level of workers – compared with no AR system – could be reduced!


As a direct follow up to the first study, Bjoern Schwerdtfeger comes on stage to describe the results of an Order Picking with AR work.

Traditionally the system includes a print out with instructions of what items to pick from bins on shelving.

How can an AR system help improve the performance of such an activity?

Glasstron by Nomad

They looked at mulitple visualization options: Frame tunnel, Rings tunnel, and 3D Arrow.

The results showed that the frame visualization was more efficient than the arrow. It’s not clear whether the rings visualization is superior.


Final speaker for this session is Gerhard Schall from Graz University to discuss Virtual Redlining for Civil Engineering in Real Environments.

What is virtual redlining? Virtually annotation paper maps or 2d digital information systems (mostly for the utility sector). This process helps significantly in the workflows associated with network planning or inspection.

The process involved mapping of 2D geographical data with 3D models of buildings and underground infrastructure. The tool developed allows for collaboration, inspection, and annotation.

Results of the usage study confirms that the AR system has significant advantage in civil engineering – in this redlining scenario. The color coding was important, as well as the digital terrain model.

Question from the audience: where do you get the 3D modeling of the piping?

Answer: Some utility companies have started to map the underground infrastructure. But in most cases we create it based on 2D maps which is only an approximation.

And that concludes the Industrial user studies session. See you next at the last session of the event: Rendering and Scene Acquisition, leading to the grand finale with the award ceremony for the winner of the Tracking Competition.


From ISMAR Program:

User studies in Industrial AR

  • Mobile Augmented Reality in Industrial Applications: Approaches for Solution of User-Related Issues
    Johannes Tuemler, Ruediger Mecke, Michael Schenk, Anke Huckauf, Fabian Doil, Georg Paul, Eberhard A. Pfister, Irina Boeckelmann, Anja Roggentin
  • Supporting Order Picking with AR
    Bjoern Schwerdtfeger, Gudrun Klinker
  • Virtual Redlining for Civil Engineering in Real Environments
    Gerhard Schall, Erick Mendez, Dieter Schmalstieg

Live From ISMAR 08: Augmented Reality Sensors and Sensor Fusion

The last day of ISMAR ’08 is upon us, and the day opens by stimulating our senses with a session about sensors.

Gabriele Bleser starts this session with a talk about Using the marginalised particle filter for real-time visual-inertial sensor fusion

She starts by showing a short clip with an erratic camera motion that makes everyone dizzie…it actually proves an important capability that she studied which creates less jitter and less requirements imposed on the camera.

She explains the basics of particle filter and the use of inertial measurement.  In the past researchers studied standard particle filter. This is the first study using the a marginalised particle filter.

Testing using the new technique (non linear state space model with linear Gaussian substructure for real time visual inertial pose estimation) with 100 particles resulted in increased robustness against rapid motions.

To prove: Gabriele shows the rapid camera movements once again…

Well, we have to suffer now so that in the future users won’t have to. Kudos Gabriele.


Next is Daniel Pustka with Dynamic Gyroscope Fusion in Ubiquitous Tracking Environments. This is part of Gudrun Klinker’s journey towards Ubi-AR.

What you need for ubiquitous tracking is automatic discovery of tracking infrastructure, and shield applications from tracking details.

Gyroscopes are very interesting to use (low latency, high update rate, always available), but they have drawbacks (drift, only  for rotation) and are only usable when fused with other sensors.

Daniel and team have proved that the ubiquitous tracking tool set consisting of spatial relationship graphs and patterns is very useful to analyze tracking setups including gyroscopes. It allows a Ubitrack system to automatically infer occasions for gyroscope fusion in dynamically changing tracking situations.


Jeroen Hol presents Relative Pose Calibration of a Spherical Camera and an IMU

This study builds on the idea that by combining vision and inertial sensors  you get accurate real time position and orientation in a robust and fast motion, and this is very suitable for AR applications. However, calibration is the essential point for this to work.

An easy to use algorithm has been developed and yields results with real data.

Ron Azuma asks: When the image is captured in high motion does it create blur?

Jeroen answers that it can be addressed by changing some parameters.


Last for this session is Wee Teck Fong from NUS to discuss A Differential GPS Carrier Phase Technique for Precision Outdoor AR Tracking.

The solution that Fong presents provides good accuracy with low jitter, drift and low computational load – and no resolution ambiguities. It works well for outdoor AR apps. With just one GPS you get an accuracy of about 10 meters plus you get high jitter of the tracking. Differential GPS using 2 GPS receivers (low cost 25mm sized) improves the accuracy of tracking. Fong and team have taken it a steps further with an advanced computational model that delivers higher precision for outdoor AR tracking. Fong claims that with a more expensive receiver he can achieve a less than 1mm accuracy, but you can’t use this technique anywhere. An infrastructure of stationary GPS stations transmitting wirelessly could provide a wide constant coverage for this technique.

Fong concludes with a positive note regarding the upcoming European update to the GPS system dubbed Galileo (in 5 years) were things will get significantly better.


From ISMAR ’08 Program

  • Using the marginalised particle filter for real-time visual-inertial sensor fusion
    Gabriele Bleser, Didier Stricker
  • Dynamic Gyroscope Fusion in Ubiquitous Tracking Environments
    Daniel Pustka, Gudrun Klinker
  • Relative Pose Calibration of a Spherical Camera and an IMU
    Jeroen Hol, Thomas Schoen, Fredrik Gustafsson
  • A Differential GPS Carrier Phase Technique for Precision Outdoor AR Tracking
    Wee Teck Fong, S. K. Ong, A. Y. C. Nee

Live from ISMAR ’08: The Gods of Augmented Reality About the Next 10 Years

Welcome to the climax of ISMAR ’08. On stage the 9 “gods” of the augmented reality community. And they are siting in a panel to muse about the next 10 years of augmented reality.

Dieter Schmalstieg took on the unenviable job of moderating this crowd of big wigs. See if he can curb them down to 3 minutes each.

Here is a blow-by-blow coverage of their thoughts.

Ron Azuma (HRL)

The only way for AR to succeed is when we insert AR into our daily lives – it has to be available all the time (like Thad Starner from GA Tech which always wears his computer)
Ron asks – What if we succeed? what are the social ramifications? those who have thought about it are science fiction writers…such as Vernor Vinge (have you read Rainbows End and Synthetic Serendipity.)

Reinhold Behringer (Leeds)

AR is at the threshold of broad applications.
Cameras, GPS, bandwidth have improved immensely – split into lo-fi AR, approximate registration, low end hardware. and also hi end AR, live see through displays, etc.
What’s missing is APIs, common frameworks, ARML descriptor (standardization)

Mark Billinghurst (HitLab NZ)

Mobility (now) – It took 10 years to go from backpack to palm
Ubiquity (5+ years) – how will AR devices work with other devices (TV, home theater, …),
Sociability – it took us 10 years to go from 2 to 4 to 8 users . When will we have massive scale?
Next is AR 2.0 with massive user generated content and a major shift from technology to user interaction

Steve Feiner – Columbia

AR means “The world = your user interface”
What will it take to make this possible?
Backpacks are ridiculous; handheld devices will look ridiculous 5 years from now – so don’t write off eyewear.
A big one is dynamic global databases for identification/tracking of real world objects. Tracking could be viewed as “just” search (granted a new kind of search.)
There is more to AR than registration; AR presentations need to be designed (AR layouts).

Gudrun Klinker – TU Munchen

|ntegrating AR with ubiquitous. We are interfacing with reality, with our senses and others are mental. We need those lenses to connect to our “senses” (not just visually – it could also be sound, etc). Combining the virtual with the real – where is the information? and can we see it? How do we communicate with the stationary world? We need to connect with the room we are in and hear the “story”. The devices at least need to talk to each other.
We also need to think about “augmented” building, they do not evolve as fast as cell phones. Another aspect is how are we going to survive “this thing”. We need much more usability studies and connect it with real world applications. The ultimate test (I challenge you to show it in next year’s competition) is a navigation system for runners. It’s easy to do it for cars – but may be harder for people.

Nassir Navab –  TU Munchen

Medical augmented reality  – showing fascinating videos of medical overlays [add videos]

The simplest idea is getting into the operation room – combining X Ray and optics as part of the common operating workflow.

Next is fusion of pre/intra operative functional and anatomical imaging; patient motion tracking and deformable registration; adaptive, intuitive and interactive visualization; Integration into surgical workflow
Finally we need to focus on changing the culture of surgeons (e.g. training with AR simulation).

Haruo Takemura – Osaka University

Showing a table comparing the pros and cons of hardware platforms: e.g. mobile have potential benefits vs HMD (but also drawbacks – such as processing power); desktop is cheap and powerful but not mobile (tethered).
Cell phones have another issue – they are tied to the carriers which is problematic for developers.

Bruce Thomas – UniSA

We are extremely interdisciplinary – and should keep it up.
However with so many of these it’s hard to develop and evaluate. And by the way innovation is difficult to articulate.
We are in a “Neat vs. Scruffy” situation – the bottom line is that a smaller self-contained pieces of research is easier to get in front of the community – and get results.

Questions floating:
is high end or low end AR the goal?
is ubiquity in AR realistic or wishful thinking?
are we innovative/.
Does augmented reality need to make more money to survive?
Platforms: Don’t write off eyewear?
Social: what if we succeed with AR?
What is the position of ISMAR in the scientific community?

A controvertial question from the audience to the panel: How many of you have subject matter expert working in your office on a daily basis? (few hands) How many of you have artists working a daily basis? (even fewer hands) How many of your research have reached the real world? (once again – few hands)

A question from the audience about the future of HMD. Mark takes the mic and asks the audience:

How many of you would wear a head mounted display? (5 hands)

How many of you would wear a head mounted display that looks like a normal glasses? (75% of the audience raise hands)

Dieter asks the panel members to conclude with one sentence each (no semi columns…)

Ron: I want to refer to the comment that the cell phone is too seductive. We should make it indispensable so users won’t want to give it up – just like a cell phone.

Mark: We need to make sure that children, grandparents, in Africa and everywhere – could use AR

Steve: You ain’t seen nothing yet; look at the progress we have made in the last 10 years! No one can predict what will happen.

Gudrun: We have to be visionary and on the other hand. We need to be realistic and make sure RA doesn’t end up like AI…don’t build hopes in areas where people shouldn’t have them…don’t let AR get burned…

Nassir: Next event we should include designers and experts from other disciplines; and create solutions that go beyond the fashion

Haruo: Maybe combining information like Googles with devices

Bruce: I want you to have fun and be passionate about what you do! We can change the world!

Applause, and that’s a wrap.

ISMAR ’08 Live: Workshop on Industrial Augmented Reality: Needs and Solutions

Welcome to the first workshop of ISMAR 2008.

We are starting with the Industrial AR workshop.

Selim Benhimane introduces ISMAR Chair Ralf Rabaetje which introduces the first speaker Dr. Werner Schreiber from Volkswagen AG.

Ralf describes the main reason for VW to research in augmented reality: “we need to find new and better ways to develop, test and produce cars. And we need to make the process less expensive.”

VW is doing it as part of a government funded project dubbed AVILUS, in collaboration with major EU companies such as Airbus, Daimler and Siemens.

One of the improvements that can be achieved with AR is improved safety.

Werner shows various technologies that are being worked on, and slides of applications for improvement in designing and building cars. Example: applying labels for air bags in the language of the car’s destination. The error rate of the previous approach (using written lists) was improved dramatically with an AR system (with an HMD). Metaio provided elements of this solution.

Werner concludes with general requirements for these type of AR systems:

  • Keep it simple
  • Intuitive without special technology know how needs
  • Standard system
  • Universal system
  • Multi use in various industrial processes
  • Less than 30 min prep time
  • Economic
Question: How did workers react to these solutions?
– Some were skeptics, other were enthusiasts…you have to find tricks to make it easy to adapt to.
Q: Are you willing to take the risk of significanlty changing the process to include AR? Why not a sound system or monitors?
– adding the information in the field of view of the worker and reducing the cost – was worth it.
Second presenter is being introduced: Dr. Axel Hildebrand from Daimler heading an AR project; a perfect continuation of the previous talk. It will focus on how to deal with the maturity gap between needs and the current technology. Axel was formerly working on AR in the Fraunhofer institute.
We recognize that technology has to go through multiple stages until it’s ready for use in industrial systems, but we also know we have to start with such technologies early – to help them mature…we need to take some risk.
From Gartner’s hype cycle: in 2006 AR was a “technology trigger”. It was conspicuously missing in 2007 and then reappeared in 2008 – yet again as “technology trigger”.
At Daimler, the technology building blocks are: Data access, Interaction, displaer, visualization, tracking.
Example applications: Mobile picking objects. (collaborated with Metaio) will start a prototype with AR at the engine assembly line.
Current mobile devices are text driven usd for quality assurance.
With Symbian based devices added visuals in context to enrich the information workers have during picking objects.
Mobile Quality Assurance – a concept of using camera to visually test quality of products being produced.
Mixed Reality Ergonomics Situation – Use AR to improve posture of workers on assembly line. Using a mockup that simulates a car to test the posture of workers during certain tasks and then improving the procedures to improve the ergonomics.
Spatial AR for Automotive Design – projecting various scenarios (e.g. colors) on car models during design process.
Factory Shop floor approval – mobile AR device superimposes data from various sources about the shop floor to check the environment.
[skiping videos – what a shame…]
Thermal protection of the Overall Vehicle – superimposedata from simulations to that workers can readjust the engine [finally showing a video explaining the technique!]
Mixed reality Assembly

Axel summarizes: Need to havea step-wise approach. Convincing the business side, with high value projects – and then going further and applying to more projects.

Technologies still immature: indoor tracking, full HMD usage, AR visualization, Interaction. And we are still before the trough of disillusionment…

Some applications will require HMDs when the activity requires to be hands free. Others mobile devices are fine. And in other cases will need spatial AR.

[Coffee break]

Gudrun Klinker introduces Shinichi the next speaker Shinichi Aratani. He will talk about the current state of industrial MR/AR at Canon.

[colorful Japanese slides] Canon started working on MR in 1997 and focuses on 4 areas: Industry, Presentation, Art and Entertainment. Interior simulation of living room, Media art, etc. After 2001 moved to industrial use such as design evaluation, digital mockups, usability testing, etc. In order to achieve  value in MR applications  Canon assumed these requirements: real scale, intuitive visualization, intuitive operation.

Between 2000 and 2007 – reduced cost in development process and intend to continue reduction of cost. One example if simplified physical prototype. 84% of workers in a canon survey thought that MR applications improve effectiveness. Some noted that HMD can be mounted for no more than 15 min (beyond that it creates motion sickness). Another issue was narrow angle view where both hands can not be viewed.

Showing demonstration video held in Tokyo last week [

get link]: simulates how to maintain a canon printer. Concept HMD used is VH2007 with higher resolution, including a video camera.

Canon intends to use CAD to simulate actual operation. Input motion parameters, display analytical simulation on top of that simulated operation. Showing concept video of a lens mockup, superimposing motion parameters of a real product. [get link]. It ‘s a promising concept, but there are still issues with resolution and picture quality…

He then goes to describe the MR platform marker technology, sensor use, calibration tools, etc.

Future work: offer a common platform for MR. Details still fuzzy…

Areas of future focus: navigation, construction, art…here is such an example:

Tracking the motion of an instrument (Clarinet) for a Media Art project : super imposed graphics change based on the sound and movement – very amusing!

Canon sees major value in MR and continue to develop the platform and HMD.


Next speaker:  Benjamin Becker (EADS) European Aeronautic Defense and Space Company

From the advanced design and visualization team working on: industrial design for aircrafts (e.g. Airbus), cabin interior, seatings, lower deck crew test, catering, lavatories. Also working on visualization for Helicopters, etc.

Main AR project: Trackframe using Ubitrack tracking framework.

AR combines multiple technologies: rendering and visualization, wearable computing, tracking. Caveats: HMD, interaction and usability, local and global tracking for large area.

Example: Sales and marketing project – present concepts of improved cabins (e.g. adding a bar) to customers and solicit feedback (add coloring, and in the future provide haptics). Spatial AR: Projecting daylight or night like on the cabin ceiling to help passengers adjust to jet lag [get video].

Explaining additional examples from maintenance, manufacturing, factory planning.

Question: Are we getting aesthetically pleasing view?

-it’s not photorealistic, but it’s better than seeing the options in a textual list…

[Unfortunately, I’ll have to miss the afternoon sessions in this track – due to the parallel Handheld mobile AR session which I can’t afford to miss…]


From ISMAR ’08 program.

Organizers: Selim Benhimane (TUM), Gudrun Klinker (TUM), Ralf Rabaetje (Volkswagen AG), Bruce H. Thomas (UniSA)

As the interest and the development of Augmented Reality (AR) is growing fast, it is important that, periodically, people from academia, research and industry sit together and discuss about what are the major limitations and results that were achieved recently. This workshop is the followup to the two successful one-day events that took place at ISMAR’05 in Vienna and at ISMAR’06 in Santa Barbara. The workshop will be split into four sessions of invited talks:

– Recent Advances in Tracking and Programming Frameworks for AR

– Requirements on AR Systems imposed by Industrial Applications

– Requirements on AR Systems imposed by Industrial Applications (continued)

– Recent Advances in Visualization and User Interfaces

There will be 9 speakers and each speaker will give 25-minute talk followed by a 5-minute questions and answers. An open discussion will take place at the end of the workshop in order to get the audience and the speakers discussing questions: What does Industry need from AR? What problems need to be solved for AR to work in Industry? What are the good target Industries for AR as it is seen in 2008?

Further information, including the full program and details of speakers, can be found on the Workshop website.