Weekly Linkfest

This is the last linkfest for this year. Though there were many more Christmas spectacles this week, I’m going to keep this linkfest holiday-spirit free (broke my nose, not feeling very festive).

  • Robert Rice on 2010, the first year in the decade of ubiquity – “The point though, is that all of these things calling themselves augmented reality now are just the start. Everyone is getting their feet wet, experimenting, exploring, and beginning to innovate. We can argue about what is or isn’t augmented reality, but it doesn’t really matter. What does matter is the continual push for advancing the technology, the industry, and getting people to start using it“.
  • On the same theme, Edo Segal writes for Techcrunch about the dawn of ambient streams – “Increasingly, we will be sensing the world with this sixth sense and that will change the way we collectively experience the world. Going back to the point made earlier, the watershed event is when we will be experiencing this “ambient sense” without being in a retrieval mode (i.e. not when we go to the computer or our mobile device
  • Whisper Deck is a cool voice operated AR interface
  • Jack Benoff of Zugara on what to do in case you are pitched an AR campaign.
  • ReadWriteWeb on the Brightkite’s new feature – AR ads.
  • Augmented Planet on Toozla, self-claimed world’s first audio AR browser (I believe Gamaray had audio support as well).
  • EyePly wants to augment your sports events.
  • And Tonchidot released its Sekai Camera browser worldwide.
  • It’s a couple of weeks old, but I finally got to read it – Wired on AR accelerated by Earthmine’s 3d city-maps.
  • Point your sneakers to your webcam in order to feel silly. Which should be on Mashable’s 10 awesome uses of AR in marketing list (what, only one car campaign? seriously, where’s that GE ad that started the fad?)
  • Denno Coil (AR fans number one anime) gets a mobile AR campaign (via @thomaskcarpente)

This week’s video is of a projected AR system coming to us from the University of Magdeburg, Germany. Though we have seen quite a few systems like that over the past years (even one coming out from Microsoft), I don’t think we have seen any as slick as that. You can read how it works (magic! infra-red markers) at New Scientist (via Augmented Engineering).

Have a great week!

2 Responses

  1. Nice to see DC being actively promoted still.
    (I’m still hoping some western company will pick it up/reimagine or port it to their marker).

    Also really pleased to see optical-based positioning take a significant step forward.

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